ECG

Electrocardiography (ECG) is a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded by a device external to the body. The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram.

An ECG is used to measure the rate and regularity of heartbeats, as well as the size and position of the chambers, the presence of any damage to the heart, and the effects of drugs or devices used to regulate the heart, such as a pacemaker.

Most ECGs are performed for diagnostic

Symptoms generally indicating use of electrocardiography include:

  • Symptoms of myocardial infarction
  • Symptoms of pulmonary embolism
  • Cardiac murmurs
  • Syncope or collapse
  • Seizures
  • Perceived cardiac dysrhythmias

 

It is also used to assess patients with systemic disease, as well as monitoring during anesthesia and critically ill patients.